At Little Gidding

ImageIn anticipation of performing Vivienne this summer at the TS Eliot Festival at Little Gidding, I thought it would be interesting to do a recce of the possible performing spaces.

First stop, Little Gidding itself. Like most people, I assumed that this had been a place of great significance for TS Eliot, hence his choice of the name for one of The Four Quartets; but according to my host, Hugh Black-Hawkins, Eliot only visited the place once (after a big lunch in Cambridge), attracted by its connections to Nicholas Ferrar and King Charles I. The original house is long gone, but the building that Eliot visited still stands and continues its long-standing service as a retreat house.

Image“Forty paces” away from where the original manor stood (still somewhat disputed) is the Church of St John, an ancient and beautiful little space, in front of which stands Ferrar’s own tomb. Alas it is too small for a performance of Vivienne but worth a visit, as the interior and panelling are wonderful.

Another possible venue for the performance is the Festival marquee that will stand on the lawn between the house and the church. However, I have discovered over the years that tents are not best suited to acoustic performance and I decided against it.

ImageLittle Gidding church and house are poised on the top of a hill, with an uninterrupted view of surrounding area for miles in all directions. Perhaps Eliot was lucky enough to see it on a perfect spring day as we did. Certainly the spirit of the place stayed with him, resurfacing when he was writing The Four Quartets many years later. The church is still a focal point for visitors seeking to connect with him and a book of his poems lay ready for us on the pew when we arrived. Just as the church is open to everyone to walk in and reflect, so Eliot’s enduring verse is on hand to the passer by as a channel for their thoughts, it would seem.